A Q& A with Sean Danker, author of Admiral

seandankerSean Danker’s first book, Admiral, just came out, and he stopped by to talk about it, and more! Please give Sean a warm welcome!
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Will you tell us a bit about Admiral and what inspired you to write it?

Admiral’s a science fiction novel about a small group of people trying to escape a dangerous planet under mysterious circumstances. As a reader, I like mystery and horror in SF, so with Admiral I wanted to do a space story that blended those elements.

What kind of research did you do for the book? What is your writing process like?

Admiral isn’t very technical, so it didn’t demand the kind of meticulous research some of my other work has. For my process, these days I always have a full outline before I start writing, though I usually end up deviating from it quite a bit.

What’s one of the first things that you can remember writing?

The two earliest stories I can clearly remember writing were both grisly horror stories – I’m not sure which of them came first, but I was around ten at the time. I’m lucky my folks didn’t have me committed, it was bleak stuff. Explains a lot, now that I think about it.

Why science fiction? What do you enjoy the most about reading, and writing, in the genre?

Some of my favorite books and movies are science fiction; there was a lot of SF media in my childhood, so that played a role. I like space, and I like creature feature stuff – and beyond that, I feel like SF’s one of the most fun genres for tackling contemporary issues from interesting angles. At least half the books I write are SF to one degree or another.

What authors have influenced you the most?

I usually cite Asimov here, but I read an awful lot of Dean Koontz when I was in high school, so it’s safe to assume some of that voice stuck with me. I read a lot of mysteries growing up, so Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Raymond Chandler, and Dashiell Hammett probably deserve some credit. Or blame. I definitely have a thing for Joseph Conrad. Kafka, Dostoevsky, Orwell. I’m all over the place.

If you could experience one book again for the first time, which one would it be?

James Howe’s Bunnicula.

What are you currently reading?

The Man in the White Suit by Ben Collins.

What’s next for you? Is there anything else you’d like to share?

At the moment I’m really just hoping everyone enjoys Admiral, but next up will probably be the rest of the Admiral’s story, and many other books.

Keep up with Sean: Website | Twitter


About Admiral:
“I was on a dead ship on an unknown planet with three trainees freshly graduated into the Imperial Service. I tried to look on the bright side.”

He is the last to wake. The label on his sleeper pad identifies him as an admiral of the Evagardian Empire—a surprise as much to him as to the three recent recruits now under his command. He wears no uniform, and he is ignorant of military protocol, but the ship’s records confirm he is their superior officer.

Whether he is an Evagardian admiral or a spy will be of little consequence if the crew members all end up dead. They are marooned on a strange world, their ship’s systems are failing one by one—and they are not alone.

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